trugatti

cannibal-swag:

rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. 

Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. 

Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.

 

how does one train a bee

cloudburstbrokenbysunshine
nprfreshair:

Evolutionary biologist Daniel Lieberman explains how we evolved to crave high-calorie sugary foods:

We evolved to crave sweet foods. Everybody loves sweet foods. But if you try to eat foods that hunter gatherers eat or chimpanzees eat, you’d be surprised at how unsweet they are. Most wild fruits are about as sweet as a carrot. So we love sweetness but until recently, pretty much the only food that we got that was sweet was honey and honey of course was a special treat, honey was pretty much the only form of dessert in the Paleolithic. But now we have access to abundant quantities of sugar and simple carbohydrates, which we evolved to love because they’re full of energy but we don’t have the metabolism. We don’t have the bodies that are able to cope with those kinds of levels of sugar and the result is that we get sick.  

Daniel Lieberman is the author of the book The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Heath, and Disease

nprfreshair:

Evolutionary biologist Daniel Lieberman explains how we evolved to crave high-calorie sugary foods:

We evolved to crave sweet foods. Everybody loves sweet foods. But if you try to eat foods that hunter gatherers eat or chimpanzees eat, you’d be surprised at how unsweet they are. Most wild fruits are about as sweet as a carrot. So we love sweetness but until recently, pretty much the only food that we got that was sweet was honey and honey of course was a special treat, honey was pretty much the only form of dessert in the Paleolithic. But now we have access to abundant quantities of sugar and simple carbohydrates, which we evolved to love because they’re full of energy but we don’t have the metabolism. We don’t have the bodies that are able to cope with those kinds of levels of sugar and the result is that we get sick.  

Daniel Lieberman is the author of the book The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Heath, and Disease

neil-gaiman

odditiesoflife:

Brinicles — The Ocean’s “Ice Fingers of Death”

Reaching down like frozen fingers from the water’s surface, where the so-called “brinicle” meets the sea bed, a web of ice forms that instantly freezes and kills everything it touches, including sea urchins and starfish.

The formation of brinicles, also known as ice stalactites, is dangerous to marine life. Sea ice is frozen fresh water because the salt in ocean water does not freeze with it. As the water freezes, high concentrations of salt are excluded. This brine – super saturated salt – gets pushed out of the ice through channels. Some of it gets pushed up and out, leaving a slightly salty layer on top of the sea ice, but much of it gets pushed down, back into the water.

As this extremely cold brine leaves the sea ice, it sinks in a descending plume and freezes the relatively fresh seawater it comes in contact with. This forms a fragile tube of ice around the descending plume into what is called a “brinicle” – an icicle of brine. These look like icicles hanging from the underside of the ice. If the brinicles keep growing and extending down to the ocean floor, they form a web of ice that freezes everything. Hence the nickname “ice fingers of death”. An amazing video which captures the formation of a brinicle was first filmed in 2011 for the BBC series Frozen Planet.

sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

ohscience
ohscience:

"Springtime in the Bay of Biscay, off the coast of France, as in most places, is a season of abundant growth. On April 20, 2013, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image of the dynamic growth of a springtime phytoplankton bloom. The swirling colors indicate the presence of vast numbers of phytoplankton – tiny plant-like microorganisms that live in both fresh and salt water. Although these organisms live year-round in the Bay of Biscay, it is only when conditions are right that explosive blooms occur. In spring, the lengthening sunlight, the increased nutrient load swept into the Bay from ocean currents and from snowmelt carried by freshwater rivers, combined with warming waters create the perfect conditions to spur phytoplankton in to tremendous growth. The result is a swirling, multi-hued discoloration that can be easily seen from space."
(NASA IOTD)

ohscience:

"Springtime in the Bay of Biscay, off the coast of France, as in most places, is a season of abundant growth. On April 20, 2013, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image of the dynamic growth of a springtime phytoplankton bloom. The swirling colors indicate the presence of vast numbers of phytoplankton – tiny plant-like microorganisms that live in both fresh and salt water. Although these organisms live year-round in the Bay of Biscay, it is only when conditions are right that explosive blooms occur. In spring, the lengthening sunlight, the increased nutrient load swept into the Bay from ocean currents and from snowmelt carried by freshwater rivers, combined with warming waters create the perfect conditions to spur phytoplankton in to tremendous growth. The result is a swirling, multi-hued discoloration that can be easily seen from space."

(NASA IOTD)

cloudburstbrokenbysunshine
pastelmorgue:

limitlesscorrosion:

221b-bacon-street:

tibets:

THIS IS A NATURALLY OCCURRING METAL WHAT

metal as fuck

This is a pure bismuth crystal. The heaviest element that is not radioactive (ok technically it is but it’s half life is like 9 orders of magnitude older than the universe so it really doesn’t count.) Probably my favourite crystal structure, even if you forget the colour. Surprisingly, bismuth is also super-not-toxic. You can actually eat the stuff and it’s often in indigestion remedies. Fascinating element, all round.

yooo

pastelmorgue:

limitlesscorrosion:

221b-bacon-street:

tibets:

THIS IS A NATURALLY OCCURRING METAL WHAT

metal as fuck

This is a pure bismuth crystal. The heaviest element that is not radioactive (ok technically it is but it’s half life is like 9 orders of magnitude older than the universe so it really doesn’t count.) Probably my favourite crystal structure, even if you forget the colour. Surprisingly, bismuth is also super-not-toxic. You can actually eat the stuff and it’s often in indigestion remedies. Fascinating element, all round.

yooo